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December 2016
S M T W T F S
     
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Syndication

This podcast is about one of the most important biological pathways you could possibly take the time to learn about: the NRF2 pathway.

The most potent naturally-occurring inducer of this pathway, a plant compound known as sulforaphane, may be one of the most potent health-enhancing compounds at our disposal and yet... no one is keeping it out of your hands! No $1,000 per pill markup is keeping it out of your hands -- it’s available to anyone willing to take the little bit of time it takes each week to produce broccoli sprouts.

In some respects, broccoli sprouts may even be a great equalizer in a way... while it’s true that healthy food can often be expensive, it’s even reasonably possible for a person to take $20 worth of seeds and feed their whole family some of the most healthful greens you could get your hands on. This video will tell you why.

Here are a few of the more salient points surrounding sulforaphane that are discussed in this podcast...

  • Profound changes in lipid biomarkers, reducing heart disease risk by as much as 50% in humans.
  • Massive reductions in cancer risk in humans and also highly effective as a cancer intervention, particularly prostate and breast but also many others.
  • Steep reductions in inflammation in humans.
  • Shown in mice to be as effective as prozac as an anti-depressant.
  • Steep behavioral changes in humans with respect to certain neurological disorders, such as autism.
  • Causes dramatic boosts in the excretion of air pollutants (up to 60%) in humans.

Key sections you may want to skip to:
00:03:35 - Cancer and mortality
00:21:56 - Aging
00:29:37 - Brain and behavior
00:41:33 - Final recap
00:44:18 - Dose

NOTE: If you enjoy this podcast, you'll enjoy the YouTube video more since it shows all of the figures and citations

 

Direct download: sulforaphane_1.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 6:01pm EST

This episode of the FoundMyFitness podcast features Dr. Valter Longo, a professor of gerontology and biological sciences and director of the longevity institute at the University of Southern California. Dr. Longo has made huge contributions to the field of aging, including the role of fasting and diet in longevity and healthspan in humans as well as metabolic fasting therapies for the treatment of human diseases.

In this podcast, Valter and I discuss...

  • The effects of prolonged fasting, which refers to 2-3 day fasting intervals in mice and 4-5 days in humans.
  • Dr. Longo’s work on the fasting-mimicking diet, which is 5 day restricted diet that is meant to simulate some of the biological effects of prolonged fasting while still allowing some food.
  • How clinical trials have demonstrated efficacy for this diet for type 2 diabetes, multiple sclerosis, and cancer patients.
  • Fasting as an inducer of differential stress resistance, where it can simultaneously make cancer cells more sensitive to death while also making healthy cells more resistant to these same death stimuli (such as chemotherapy) which might otherwise induce cell death amongst healthy cells as collateral damage.
  • Fasting as a biological state which humans historically experienced with extreme regularity and we may ultimately need in order to mitigate various disease states.
  • The effects of prolonged fasting on the immune system, namely, how it clears away damaged white blood  cells via autophagy and how this causes hematopoietic stem cells to self renew and make more stem cells and also produce new blood cells to fully replenish the white blood cell population.
  • How prolonged fasting causes a shift in the immune cell population towards one that is more representative of youth by normalizing the ratio of myeloid cells to lymphoid cells.
  • The positive effects of prolonged fasting and the fasting-mimicking diet on markers of systemic inflammation, blood glucose levels and other aging biomarkers.
  • The conclusions of Dr. Longo & Dr. Marcus Bock’s research comparing 1 week of the fasting-mimicking diet followed by 6 months of mediterranean diet to six months of a ketogenic diet in people with multiple sclerosis.
  • The strange, somewhat paradoxical role of autophagy genes in cancer progression and some of the open questions surrounding the exact role that these genes are playing.
  • Dr. Longo’s high level thoughts on metformin as an anti-aging drug.
  • How the growth hormone/IGF-1 axis is one of the most important genetic pathways in aging from yeast to worms to mice to humans.

You can learn more about the fasting-mimicking diet by visiting prolonfmd.com and you can receive an email when Dr. Longo published his upcoming book (English version) by following his profile on Amazon.

Direct download: longo_1.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 5:24pm EST

Today's episode features Dr. Ruth Patterson, a professor in the UC San Diego Department of Family Medicine and Public Health as well as Associate Director of Population Sciences and leader of the Cancer Prevention program at Moores Cancer Center at UC San Diego Health. If you enjoyed my last episode with Dr. Satchin Panda, I have good news! This will also be a great episode for you, since we talk about some similar ideas, but focus more on the human side of things, especially when it comes to time-restricted eating, since Dr. Patterson does primarily clinical research.

In this 45-minute podcast, we talk about...

  • The importance of time-restricted eating as a practical public health intervention, mostly for it's ease of implementation, that may have a widespread impact on disease risk.
  • Why you should probably make sure your time-restricted eating window occurs earlier in the day, rather than later.
  • How the first 5% drop in weight loss can have disproportionately large effects on the metabolic factors associated with breast cancer risk when compared with subsequent weight loss.
  • The association of longer fasting durations beginning earlier in the evening and improved sleep in humans, as well as spontaneous physical activity in their day-to-day lives.
  • The relationship between metabolism and breast cancer risk.
  • The effect of lifestyle factors, such as obesity, physical activity, what and even when you eat, whether or not you smoke tobacco... and how even modest changes, such as consuming food earlier in the day and only during an 11-hour window, can decrease breast cancer risk and recurrence by as much as 36%.
  • The importance of starting your fast earlier in the evening, and how an earlier eating window has been shown to correlate to reductions in inflammatory markers.
  • The association of higher circulating insulin levels with breast cancer risk, and how insulin itself has an important relationship with estrogen by affecting the levels of sex-hormone binding globulin.
  • The dangers of having a cellular environment that is inflamed, as the case is with the obese, and simultaneously having elevated cellular growth signals, which is also characteristic of the hormonal milieu of the obese.
  • The surprisingly small role heredity plays in determining overall risk of breast cancer when compared to lifestyle factors.
  • How healthful lifestyle habits, like choosing to eat during the right window, ultimately helps us trend our risk for many of the diseases of old age in the correct direction instead of influencing only one or another.

If the concept of time-restricted eating especially piques your interest, make sure to...

  1. Check out the podcast released just prior to this one: Dr. Satchin Panda on Time-Restricted Feeding and Its Effects on Obesity, Muscle Mass & Heart Health.
  2. Make sure your data points go to good use! Visit myCircadianClock.org to learn how you can, by committing to a minimum of a 14 week "intervention" and submitting pictures of your food from your iPhone or Android phone, move human research on time-restricted eating forward.

Huge special thanks to Dr. Ruth Patterson for coming on. Enjoy the podcast!

Direct download: ruth_patterson_1.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 1:04pm EST

Dr. Rhonda Patrick speaks with Dr. Satchin Panda, a professor at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies in La Jolla California. Satchin's work deals specifically with the timing of food and it's relationship with our biological clocks governed by circadian rhythm and also the circadian rhythm in general.

In this video we discuss...

  • The fascinating history of experimentation that ultimately elucidated the location for the region of the brain necessary for a properly timed sleep-wake cycles.
  • The relationship between our body's "master clock" and it's many peripheral clocks.
  • Why infants sleep so intermittently, instead of resting for a longer, sustained duration like healthy young adults... and why this sustained rest also goes haywire in the elderly.
  • The fascinating work Dr. Panda took part in that lead to the discovery of a specialized light receptor in the eye that sets circadian rhythms and is known as melanopsin.
  • The important relationship between the relatively light insensitive melanopsin, which requires around 1,000 lux of light to be fully activated, and its control of the circadian clock by means of activation of the suprachiasmatic nucleus and suppression of melatonin.
  • The effects light exposure seems to have on next-day cortisol, a glucocorticoid hormone that regulates around 10-20% of the human protein-encoding genome.
  • The clever experimental design by which Dr. Panda and his colleagues discovered that certain circadian rhythms, especially of the liver, are entrained by when we eat, instead of how much light we get. This underlines the fact that, when managing are circadian rhythm, both elements are important!
  • One of the more surprising effects of time-restricted feeding in mice eating a so-called healthy diet: increases in muscle mass and even endurance in some cases.

Interested in trying out time-restricted feeding? Don't let your data points go to waste! You can try out time-restricted feeding and have a real impact on human research! Commit to 14 weeks and download Dr. Panda's mobile app to get started. Learn more at: mycircadianclock.org/participant

Direct download: satchin_panda_1.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 6:41pm EST

Dr. Rhonda Patrick speaks with Ray Cronise, a former NASA material scientist and cofounder of zero gravity, a company that offers weightless parabolic flights to consumers and researchers. In this episode, coming at the tail end of a rather extreme 23-day water fast for Ray, we discuss, perhaps unsurprisingly, some of the benefits that are associated with fasting! Ray talks about shifting one's perspective from looking at nutrition only through the lens of meeting day-to-day nutritional needs, and instead, also considering optimizing metabolism for longer-term effects as well, the importance of thinking about longevity in the context of functional healthspan, some of the similarities between the body’s physiological response to heat stress, cold stress, and exercise and so much more.

Learn more about Ray Cronise by visiting his website at hypothermics.com (raycronise.com) or by saying hello on twitter: twitter.com/raycronise.


Finally, Ray also has a book available for pre-order called "Our Broken Plate."

Direct download: ray_cronise_1.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:52pm EST

This podcast is with Dr. Dominic D'Agostino, an assistant professor at the University of South Florida in Tampa and all around expert on ketosis. In this podcast we discuss...

  • Dom's efforts at teasing out the differences between induced nutritional ketosis (through a low carbohydrate, high fat diet) and ketosis from the dietary introduction of exogenous ketones, like beta-hydroxybutyrate, especially in the context of therapeutic and performance enhancing effects. 
  • His work on formulating ketone esters.
  • The differences in tolerability between MCT (medium chain triglycerides) powders versus liquids, as well as the amount of supplemental MCT a person would need to consume in order to achieve mild ketosis without carbohydrate restriction.
  • The differences between different types of ketogenic diets.
  • The modified atkins diet which has been demonstrated to have similar efficacy to the classical ketogenic diet in the treatment of drug-resistant epilepsy and how it may be a slightly more practical option for achieving therapeutic nutritional ketosis.
  • The importance of making the correct carbohydrate choices, even and maybe especially in the context of a ketogenic diet, with a diverse variety of raw vegetables being the most favorable.
  • What keto adaptation is and what it means, at a physiological level, to be keto adapted and how this is distinguished from short periods of ketosis we experience in our day-to-day lives.
  • Some of Dom's ideas around cycling various dietary strategies as a way of promoting metabolic flexibility.
  • How ketones, when used as a source of energy, may result in a net reduction in the number of damaging reactive byproducts known as reactive oxygen species than what may be produced by other forms of energy metabolism while also producing more ATP from, proportionately, the same amount of oxygen.

... AND SO MUCH MORE. OH MY LORD THERE IS SO MUCH MORE. Enjoy!

Direct download: dagostino_1.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 4:45pm EST

This podcast is with Dr. Peter Attia. Peter is the founder of Attia Medical, a medical practice with offices in San Diego and New York City, focusing on the applied science of longevity and optimal performance. You may have first heard about Dr. Attia from his two interviews that have been on the Tim Ferriss show, or from any number of popular presentations he's given that were filmed and put online. In addition to being a medical doctor, Dr. Attia has done research on the role of regulatory T cells in cancer regression and other immune-based therapies for cancer. Regulatory T cells have also been, in the past, referred to as suppressor T cells because of their role in actually attenuating or reducing the inflammatory response. Dr. Attia and I share interests in all things related to longevity and healthspan, which includes the role of diet, nutrition, sleep, exercise, and stress. Dr. Attia is a medical doctor and specializes in implementing these strategies in clinical practice. You can learn more about that at his website www.attiamedical.com.

Direct download: peter_attia_1.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 8:01pm EST

This podcast has a 20-page report associated with it! Get it now at foundmyfitness.com/cryotherapy. Dr. Rhonda Patrick explains how cold shock is a type of hormesis, which is a description of a type of stress that, in the right doses, is enough to shock the body and kick off adaptive processes and response mechanisms that are hardwired into our genes, and, once on, are able to create a resilience that actually exceeds what was needed to counter the initial stimuli. Rhonda discusses how cold exposure increases norepinephrine up to 5-fold in the brain and what the temperature and duration needed to do this are, how norepinephrine has an affect on mood, vigilance, focus, and attention, how cold exposure increases cold shock proteins including one in the brain that repairs damaged synapses and in muscle prevents atrophy, how cold-induced norepinephrine lowers inflammation and pain by decreasing the levels of 3 inflammatory mediators, how chronic cold shock may increase immune cell numbers and particularly a type of immune cell that kills cancer cells, how cold exposure increases metabolic rate, the number of mitochondria, and the burning of fat, what the effects of different cold exposure temperatures and timing are on athletic performance, recovery time, and muscle mass, and the differences between various types of cold shock modalities, including cold water immersion and whole body cryotherapy.

Direct download: cryotherapy_solocast_1.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:02pm EST

This podcast features Rich Roll. Rich is an author, a podcaster ("Rich Roll Podcast" on iTunes), as well as founder and first person to complete the EPIC5 Challenge. The EPIC5 challenge involves completing 5 Full Iron Distance triathlons on 5 Hawaiian islands in under a week. Rich has also been a repeated top finisher in the Ultraman World Championships in Hawaii, which is a three-day, 515km (320 mile) annual endurance race held on the Big Island of Hawaii. The race is divided into three stages over three days: The first is a 6.2 mile (10-km) ocean swim, followed by a 90-mile (145-km) cross-country bike ride, with vertical climbs that total 6,000 feet. Stage two is a 171.4-mile (276-km) bike ride, with total vertical climbs of 4,000 feet. Finally, stage three is a 52.4-mile (84-km) double marathon. Each stage must be completed within 12 hours or less. You can read about Rich's journey to Ultraman competitor in his book, "Finding Ultra: Rejecting Middle Age, Becoming One of the World's Fittest Men, and Discovering Myself."

Direct download: rich_roll_1.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 2:47pm EST

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