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December 2015
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Syndication

In this episode, Dr. Rhonda Patrick chats with Dr. Darya and Kevin Rose. They chat about Darya's fascinating experience on a 10-day silent meditation retreat where she spent around 7 hours a day doing seated meditation, intermingled with another 6 hours a day of walking meditation. They discuss the biological significance of mindfulness while eating, unlocking the mysteries of blood glucose by actually testing your response to foods, or, in Kevin's case, alcoholic beverages. Kevin talks about his experiments with a ketogenic diet featuring large amounts of vegetables combined with fats to drive his ketosis and other ideas and projects he is working on. They also discuss how intermittent fasting and how intermittent fasting functions as a beneficial hormetic stressor that activates gene expression changes that can actually make you more resilient and much more!

Direct download: roses_1.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 1:35pm EST

Dr. Rhonda Patrick interviews Dr. Pierre Capel, professor emeritus in experimental immunology at the Utrecht University in the Netherlands where he researched a wide range of topics from genetic modification to cancer immunotherapy. Pierre also works with Wim Hof, otherwise known as the iceman (guest on the last podcast) who is especially well-known for some of his amazing physical feats, like staying in a tub with direct contact to ice for over an hour and fifty three minutes. Pierre explains some of the science behind how Wim is able to withstand cold temperatures for prolonged periods of time. The explanation comes down to what the 2014 PNAS study on Wim's technique showed: that reductions in carbon dioxide temporarily increased blood pH. The missing piece to the puzzle that Pierre brings in is the simple fact that pain receptors that are critical to feeling cold temperatures actually rely on what are known as "acid sensing ion channels", which have been shown in other studies to become inactive within the pH ranges Wim and his trainees are able to increase their blood to. In addition to talking about some of the thermo- and pain- receptor stuff, Pierre and Rhonda also discuss other cool literature he's familiar with, including:

  1. Good stress and bad stress and how meditation affects the expression your genes.
  2. Meditation and the speed with which it affects fMRI changes.
  3. How even loneliness can change gene expression, including some involved in metabolism, inflammation, and the endocrine system.
  4. The effect of social isolation in mice on cancer metastasis, and conversely how wound healing can be affected in mice just by changes in their environment.
  5. What affects the stress hormone cortisol has on gene expression.
  6. What the inflammasome is and how its activation can be linked to the central nervous system. How the limbic system regulates emotions (and this is not easily controlled) but meditation has been shown to help control the limbic system.
Direct download: pierre_capel_1.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 6:37pm EST

Dr. Rhonda Patrick interviews Wim Hof also known as the "Iceman." Wim holds the world record for the longest ice bath (1 hour and 53 minutes and 12 seconds), just to name one of his many impressive feats. Dr. Patrick and Wim talk a bit about Wim's back story that culminated in him trying out cold water immersion, the relatively recent 2014 scientific publication of the “Wim Hof Method” which includes cold exposure during training, exposure to bacterial endotoxin, Wim's breathing techniques, and meditation (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24799686). The 2014 study demonstrated the effects of just 4 days of training with the “Wim Hof method” on 12 volunteers injected with bacterial endotoxin. Some of the effects include: increased epinephrine, norepinephrine, increased anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-10), decreased pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-alpha), increased blood ph to 7.75 (in some cases), and decreased carbon dioxide blood levels. The results of this study hint at some very interesting possibilities that might explain why Wim's technique helps him to endure the cold more, as well as how he was able to suppress his inflammatory response to endotoxin himself.

Direct download: wim_hof_1.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 3:05am EST

In this audio recorded Oct. 3rd, 2015, Dr. Rhonda Patrick delivers the keynote lecture at the Orthomolecular Medicine Congress in Bussum, Netherlands (MBOG Congres 2015). Discussion includes how micronutrient inadequacies are very prevalent, and how her mentor, Dr. Bruce Ames, found that the body does a strategic rationing so that those proteins and enzymes in the body which are essential for short-term survival get their share of vitamins and minerals at the expense of other proteins and enzymes that are essential for long-term survival. This results in insidious types of damage and may lead to diseases of aging such as cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. She also discusses her ongoing clinical research on the role of DNA damage in cancer and aging and how her data shows that obese individuals have much more DNA damage than lean individuals, her recent research on how vitamin D is needed to produce serotonin in the brain and how this may be relevant for the prevention of autism because serotonin shapes the structure and wiring of the developing fetal brain. Finally, she talks about her research on how omega-3 fatty acids regulate serotonin release from neurons and receptor function and how vitamin D and omega-3 fatty acids are important to prevent brain dysfunction particularly in individuals that have gene polymorphisms in the serotonin pathway that predispose them to low serotonin.

Direct download: orthomolecular_congress_1.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 1:26am EST

In this podcast I discuss some of the mechanisms by which chronic stress (and rumination) affect the brain and brain aging, the gut and inflammation, the immune system, and biological aging through acceleration of telomere shortening. I talk about how meditation can buffer these negative effects of stress and improve cognitive performance, brain aging and biological aging in general. Get the free report: foundmyfitness.com/meditation-report

Direct download: meditation_solocast_1.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 1:23pm EST

In this episode Rhonda talks about how heat stress from using the sauna makes the body more resilient to the stresses of aging, possible reasons why one study associated sauna use with up to a 40% lower all-cause mortality as well as a 50% lower cardiovascular disease related mortality, how it enhances athletic endurance, staves off muscle atrophy, improves regrowth of muscle after disuse, and some of the profound effects on the brain, including the growth of new brain cells, improvement in focus, learning, and memory, and even potentially ameliorating depression and anxiety. She also talks about how BPA, PCBs, phthalates, and other metals are excreted through sweat. In addition, she addresses some practical applications like temperature and duration in the sauna, the difference between a dry, wet and infrared sauna, sauna timing, as well as other forms of heat stress such as steam showers, hot baths, and hot yoga.

Direct download: sauna_solocast_1.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 4:48am EST

Dr. Justin Sonnenburg is an associate professor of microbiology and immunology at Stanford and Dr. Erica Sonnenburg is a senior research scientist in the Sonnenburg lab where they research many aspects the interaction between diet with the 100 trillion or so bacteria in the gut (specifically the colon) and how this impacts the health of the host (which in this case is a laboratory research mouse). In this episode we discuss the pivotal role fiber plays in fueling good bacteria in the gut to produce compounds that regulate the immune system including increasing the number of T regulatory cells, which are specialized types of immune cells that keep the immune system in check and prevent autoimmune responses, and how these compounds also increase other types of blood cells in the body in a process known as hematopoiesis. We also talk about how the lack of fiber in the typical American diet actually starves these good bacteria of their food. This has an effect not only on the immune system and autoimmune diseases but also results in the breakdown of the gut barrier, which leads to widespread inflammation and inflammatory diseases. Lastly, in this podcast, Dr. Erica Sonnenburg talks about how C-sections, have a negative effect on the infant’s gut due to the lack of exposure to bacteria present in the mother’s vaginal canal, and how the use of formula deprives the infant not only from the good bacteria present in Mom’s gut but also from special carbohydrates in breast milk that are good for the infant gut flora known as HMOs or human milk oligosaccharides.
Direct download: sonnenburg_1.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 4:17am EST

Dr. Ronald Krauss, M.D. is the director of atherosclerosis research at Children’s Hospital Oakland Research Institute, Adjunct Professor at UCSF and UC Berkeley. Dr. Krauss is really one of the pioneering scientists that changed the way we all think about cholesterol and saturated fat. He developed an assay that allows the quantification of low density lipoprotein particle size and concentration (known to the wider world as LDL cholesterol) based on a technique which determines the size of the particle based on physics...meaning the speed at which it flies through the air. In this episode, Rhonda and Ron discuss what HDL and LDL cholesterol are, what they do in the body and how they play a role in heart disease. We talk about what small, dense LDL particles are, how they form, what effect eating saturated fat versus refined carbohydrates have on LDL particle size and heart disease risk and more generally what the main risk factors for heart disease are. Ron also talks about the good, bad and the ugly of LDL-lowering drugs known as statins and much more.

Direct download: ronald_krauss_1.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 3:29am EST

Meet some of the CHORI bar team: Dr. Bruce Ames, Dr. Joyce McCann, and Dr. Mark Shigenaga. On this podcast we talk about the different types of HDL and LDL cholesterol and what they do in the body. We discuss a low-calorie, micronutrient- and fiber-dense nutrition bar (referred to as the CHORI bar) that Bruce and I briefly touched on in a previous conversation, how each of the components of the bar from the vitamins and minerals to the fiber and polyphenols are all really important but have separate functions in the body that can work together in much the same way an orchestra play their individual parts to create a symphony that is larger than their individual roles, how the chori bar raised a certain type of HDL in lead adults in just two weeks, how eating the CHORI bar raised HDL, lowered triglycerides and small LDL particles, and improved insulin sensitivity after eight weeks in overweight/obese individuals all without them changing their diet.

The CHORI bar is not available for consumers yet but you can keep up with choribar updates on bruceames.org/choribar.

Direct download: choribar_team_1.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:16am EST

Dr. Aubrey de Grey is a biomedical gerontologist and the founder of the SENS research foundation which aims to find technologies that can repair the various types of damage that occur during the aging process. In this episode Rhonda and Aubrey discuss the types of damage that cause aging, how aging results in a decrease in the capacity to repair damage, what role epigenetics play in aging, how people age at different rates, chronic inflammation as a driver of aging, factors that are in young blood that repair damage, the role of nutrition in aging, and recent technologies such as CRISPR, induced pluripotent stem cells that will advance anti-aging research and more. You can find Aubrey on twitter at @aubreydegrey, and his foundation at www.sens.org.

Direct download: aubrey_de_grey_1.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 2:49am EST